Therapeutic  Massage

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Relaxing Massage   30 minutes, $30    One Hour $60

Deep Tissue Massage 30 minutes, $40
One Hour  $75
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Lymphatic Drainage Massage-- Light work focusing on aiding the pumping action of the body's natural lymph system to aid in detoxification and movement of lymphatic fluid to be released by the body's natural system.  $110 to $130 per 90 minutes.

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Craniosacral Massage 

Craniosacral therapy (CST) is sometimes also referred to as craniosacral therapy. It’s a type of bodywork that relieves compression in the bones of the head, sacrum (a triangular bone in the lower back), and spinal column.

CST is noninvasive. It uses gentle pressure on the head, neck, and back to relieve the stress and pain caused by compression. It can, as a result, help to treat a number of conditions.

It’s thought that through the gentle manipulation of the bones in the skull, spine, and pelvis, the flow of cerebrospinal fluid in the central nervous system can be normalized. This removes “blockages” from the normal flow, which enhances the body’s ability to heal.

CST may relieve compression in the head, neck, and back. This can soothe pain and release both emotional and physical stress and tension. It’s also thought to help restore cranial mobility and ease or release restrictions of the head, neck, and nerves.

Cranial sacral therapy can be used for people of all ages. It may be used for conditions like:

  • migraines and headaches

  • constipation

  • irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)

  • disturbed sleep cycles and insomnia

  • scoliosis

  • stress and PTSD

  • sinus infections

  • neck pain

  • fibromyalgia

  • after surgery care

  • recurrent ear infections or colic in infants

  • TMJ

  • trauma recovery, including trauma from whiplash

  • mood disorders like anxiety or depression

  • Lyme disease side effect relief

There’s plenty of anecdotal evidence that CST is an effective treatment, but more research is needed to scientifically determine this. There’s evidence that it can relieve stress and tension, though some research suggests that it may only be effective for infants, toddlers, and children.

Other studies, however, indicate that CST may be an effective treatment — or part of an effective treatment plan — for certain conditions. One 2012 Trusted Source study found that it was effective at reducing symptoms in those with severe migraines. Another study found that people with fibromyalgia experienced relief from symptoms (including pain and anxiety) thanks to CST.

Side effects and risks

The most common side effect of cranial sacral therapy is mild discomfort following the treatment. This is often temporary and will fade within 24 hours.

There are certain individuals who shouldn’t use CST. These include people who have:

  • severe bleeding disorders

  • a diagnosed aneurysm

  • a history of recent traumatic head injuries, which may include cranial bleeding or skull fractures

Procedure and technique

When you arrive for your appointment, your practitioner will ask you about your symptoms and any preexisting conditions that you have.

You’ll typically remain fully clothed during the treatment, so wear comfortable clothing to your appointment. Your session will last about an hour, and you’ll likely begin by lying down on your back on the massage table. The practitioner may begin at your head, feet, or near the middle of your body.

Using five grams of pressure (which is about the weight of a nickel), the provider will gently hold your feet, head, or sacrum to listen to their subtle rhythms. If they detect it’s needed, they may gently press or reposition you to normalize the flow of the cerebrospinal fluids. They may use tissue-release methods while supporting one of your limbs.

During the treatment, some people experience different sensations. These may include:

  • feeling deep relaxation

  • a floating sensation

  • falling asleep, and later recalling memories or seeing colors

  • sensing pulsations

  • having a “pins and needles” (numbing) sensation

  • having a hot or cold sensation

One hour $80,   90 minutes   $120

 

Cupping Therapy

What is cupping?

Cupping is a type of alternative therapy that originated in China. It involves placing cups on the skin to create suction. The suction may facilitate healing with blood flow.

Proponents also claim the suction helps facilitate the flow of “qi” in the body. Qi is a Chinese word meaning life force. A famous Taoist alchemist and herbalist, Ge Hong, reportedly first practiced cupping. He lived from A.D. 281 to 341.

Many Taoists believe that cupping helps balance yin and yang, or the negative and positive, within the body. Restoring balance between these two extremes is thought to help with the body’s resistance to pathogens as well as its ability to increase blood flow and reduce pain.

Cupping increases blood circulation to the area where the cups are placed. This may relieve muscle tension, which can improve overall blood flow and promote cell repair. It may also help form new connective tissues and create new blood vessels in the tissue.

People use cupping to complement their care for a host of issues and conditions.

What are the different types of cupping?

Cupping was originally performed using animal horns. Later, the “cups” were made from bamboo and then ceramic. The suction was primarily created through the use of heat. The cups were originally heated with fire and then applied to the skin. As they cooled, the cups drew the skin inside.

Modern cupping is often performed using glass cups that are rounded like balls and open on one end. Some prefer silicone cups.

There are two main categories of cupping performed today:

  • Dry cupping is a suction-only method.

  • Wet cupping may involve both suction and controlled medicinal bleeding, however, I do not do this method.

Your practitioner, your medical condition, and your preferences will help determine what method is used. I only use the dry method as well as cupping massage which uses a thin layer of coconut oil. 

I personalize each session, and if you want the benefits of cupping without the red circles, I can do that!

 

What should I expect during a cupping treatment?

During a cupping treatment, a cup is placed on the skin and then  suctioned onto the skin. 

I use silicone suction cups only.

Some modern cupping practitioners have shifted to using rubber pumps to create suction versus more traditional heat methods.

When the cup is placed on your skin, the air inside the cup cools and creates a vacuum that draws the skin and muscle upward into the cup. Your skin may turn red as the blood vessels respond to the change in pressure.

With dry cupping, the cup is set in place for a set time, usually between 5 and 10 minutes. 

After the cups are removed, the practitioner may lightly massage the area with coconut oil. Any mild bruising or other marks usually go away within 10 days of the session.

Cupping is sometimes performed along with acupuncture treatments. For best results, you may also want to fast or eat only light meals for two to three hours before your cupping session.

 

What conditions can cupping treat?

Cupping has been used to treat a wide variety of conditions. It may be particularly effective at easing conditions that create muscle aches and pains.

Since the cups can also be applied to major acupressure points, the practice is possibly effective at treating digestive issues, skin issues, and other conditions commonly treated with acupressure.

2012 review of studies Trusted Source suggests cupping therapy’s healing power may be more than just a placebo effect. The researchers found that cupping therapy may help with the following conditions, among others:

However, the authors acknowledge that most of the 135 studies they reviewed contain a high level of bias. More studies are needed to assess the true effectiveness of cupping.

 

Side effects

There aren’t many side effects associated with cupping. The side effects you may experience will typically occur during your treatment or immediately after.

You may feel lightheaded or dizzy during your treatment. You may also experience sweating or nausea.

After treatment, the skin around the rim of the cup may become irritated and marked in a circular pattern; or feel lightheaded or dizzy shortly after your session.

I will thoroughly evaluate you before your session and have you complete a question handout.

Other risks include:

  • scarring of the skin

  • hematoma (bruising)

Things to keep in mind

Most medical professionals don’t have training or a background in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Your doctor may be cautious or uncomfortable with answering questions related to healing methods like cupping.

Some CAM practitioners may be particularly enthusiastic about their methods, even suggesting you skip over conventional medical treatments advised by your doctor.

But if you do choose to try cupping as part of your treatment plan, discuss your decision with your doctor. Continue with regular doctor visits related to your condition to get the best of both worlds.

Cupping therapy isn’t recommended for everyone. Extra caution should be taken for the following groups:

  • Children. Children under 4 years old shouldn’t receive cupping therapy. Older children should only be treated for very short periods.

  • Seniors. Our skin becomes more fragile as we age. Any medication you may be taking might have an effect as well.

  • Pregnant people. Avoid cupping the abdomen and lower back.

  • Those who are currently menstruating.

Don’t use cupping if you use blood-thinning medication. Also avoid cupping if you have:

  • a sunburn

  • a wound

  • a skin ulcer

  • experienced recent trauma

  • an internal organ disorder

 

Preparing for your cupping appointment

Cupping is a long-practiced treatment that may help ease the symptoms of both temporary and chronic health conditions.

As with many alternative therapies, keep in mind that there haven’t been extensive studies performed without bias to fully assess its true effectiveness.

If you choose to try cupping, consider using it as a complement to your current doctor visits, not a substitute.

Here are some things to consider before beginning cupping therapy:

  • What conditions does the cupping practitioner specialize in treating?

  • What method of cupping does the practitioner use?

  • Is the facility clean? Does the practitioner implement safety measurements?

  • Does the practitioner have any certifications?

  • Do you have a condition that may benefit from cupping?

Before beginning any alternative therapy, remember to let your doctor know that you’re planning to incorporate it into your treatment plan.

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Prices:

$40 for 30 minutes

$70 for 60 minutes

$1 per minute above alloted time

"One of the best massages I have ever had! Janet hit all the right pressure points to alleviate my sore, achy muscles. I felt amazing after she was finished with the session".     --Mary
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I offer on-site massage so that you can relax in your own home after receiving your massage. I also can see you in my massage room.

Janet Brown has been a certified massage therapist since 1996 and utilizes intuitive techniques to give her clients the best massage suited to their individual needs.

"there is not a better person in all of michigan that you could have as your therapist. Janet is so widely versed in so many varied practices that you are sure to have wondrous experiences."

I feel blessed to proudly proclaim that Janet is my healer and has helped my body, mind and soul this year. I have gotten massages and use the Bach flower remedies. Janet has so many gifts of healing to share with the world and I have only scratched the surface. if you have any area to be healed, Janet is your girl!!! Her vast knowledge and wisdom of so many practices makes her a great 'go-to' healer.  –Patty